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CJI announces access to verdicts in scheduled languages from Republic Day

By Lawstreet News Network      Jan 26, 2023      1 Comments
CJI announces access to verdicts in scheduled languages from Republic Day

Chief Justice of India D Y Chandrachud on Wednesday announced that top court’s judgements in various Indian scheduled languages would now be made available on Republic Day.

As the bench led by the CJI assembled to conduct the day’s proceedings, he told the lawyers that a part of the electronic-Supreme Court Reports (e-SCR) project will be operationalised to make judgements available in some scheduled languages from Thursday. This will be free to access service.

The judgments will be available on the apex court website, its mobile app and on the National Judicial Data Grid (NJDG).

“We have the e-SCR (project), which now has nearly 34,000 judgments and an elastic search facility,” he said.

According to a statement, on the occasion of the 74th Republic Day, the Registry of Supreme Court would release translation of 1268 judgments in different Indian languages. The translated versions of some Supreme Court judgements are being made available in thirteen Indian languages Assamese, Garo, Hindi, Kannada, Khasi, Malayalam, Marathi, Nepali, Odia, Punjabi, Tamil, Telugu and Urdu.

"To begin with a translation of 1268 judgements i.e. 1091 Hindi, 21 Odia, 14 Marathi, 4 Assamese, 1 Garo, 17 Kannada, 1 Khasi, 29 Malayalam, 3 Nepali, 4 Punjabi, 52 Tamil, 28 Telugu and 3 Urdu; are being made available at the e-SCR portal. The portal which is the repository of the electronic version of Supreme Court Reports (SCR), the official publication of Supreme Court of India now has some new features in it," the statement said.

There are 22 languages in the Eighth Schedule of the Constitution including Assamese, Bengali, Gujarati, Hindi, Kannada, Kashmiri, Konkani, Malayalam, Manipuri, Marathi, Nepali, Oriya, Punjabi, Sanskrit, Sindhi, Tamil, Telugu, Urdu, Bodo, Santhali, Maithili and Dogri.

Earlier this month, the apex court had launched the e-SCR project to provide free access to nearly 34,000 judgments to lawyers, law students, and the general public.



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John Doe
kp Jan 30, 2023

Equal Education policy needed for India: If English medium education is better in India then why not translate all English curriculum and Sanskrit literature in regional languages and provide equal education/information to all? Don't people read PM's Mann kī Bāt in all regional languages on websites? Don't they teach the Bible in all Indian languages? Sanskrit scholars provide Vedic knowledge to westerners in English via translation and transliteration but not the same way to fellow Indians who protect languages and culture in Indic scripts.Gujarat has given great political leaders as well as simple script to the nation and yet Hindi is taught in a complex printing ink wasting script despite it’s simplification into Gujanāgari script. If pundits were happy with the complex printing ink-wasting Devanagari script they may not have created various scripts under different rulers for vernacular languages to divide the country. Nowadays Devanagari Lipi Parishad prefers a single Devanagari script despite it's simplification into Gujanāgarī script for all Indian languages to slowly eliminate vernacular scripts the way they did with Maharashtra's MODI script. Westerners learn Sanskrit in English via translation and transliteration and challenge Indians but Indians are not allowed to learn Sanskrit the same way in vernacular languages.Why not make the same efforts in teaching mother language as you do for Sanskrit? How is modern Sanskrit going to be better than Vedic Sanskrit in providing knowledge? Does the government spend an equal amount of money on the promotion of all state languages? India needs to create more jobs for Indic translators to provide equal education and information to all in Indic languages. Also India has more English speakers than Great Britain and yet Indian English doesn't have itś own Indian English dictionary with pronunciation key to challenge IPA with highly phonetic Indic alphabets. http://sanskrit-ai.com/threads/mappings-for-devan%C4%81gar%C4%AB-indic-roman%C4%81gar%C4%AB.333/ Since Sanskrit has complex grammar and lengthy sandhi words in sentences it may not be good for effective speech, for rhyming poetic words as well as for voice to text typing, dictation and effective translation without lengthy interpretation. If India's four percent of pundits can earn livelihood by praising Sanskrit, performing rituals and reading Satyanarayan Katha to villagers, why should they learn Sanskrit the hard way ? Sanskrit is taught in schools and colleges and used in Vedic rituals but how many of these people are fluent in Sanskrit? NCERT prefers to provide education in Hindi and Urdu but not in regional languages. Why? If Hindi can be written in Urdu script then why not in regional scripts the way Sanskrit can be written? Newly added Sanskrit on Google Translate could pose a challenge to Indian pundits who traditionally impart Vedic knowledge to Westerners through translation and transliteration tools but not to fellow Indians who defend scripts and culture in local languages. India needed Macaulay to acquire Sanskrit knowledge through translation and transliteration in each language the way he had achieved in English.

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